The March 2 - 3 tornado outbreak: one EF-4, 39 deaths

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 02:40 PM GMT am 05. März 2012

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A blanket of snow 2 - 4 inches deep fell yesterday on the regions of Southern Indiana and Northern Kentucky pounded by deadly tornadoes on Friday, adding to the misery of survivors. The violent tornado rampage killed 39 and injured hundreds more, wreaking property damage that will likely exceed $1 billion. Hardest hit were Kentucky and Southern Indiana, which suffered 21 and 12 dead, respectively. Three were killed in Ohio, and one each in Alabama and Georgia. The scale of the outbreak was enormous, with a preliminary total of 139 tornadoes touching down in eleven states, from southern Ohio to Northern Florida. The National Weather Service issued 297 tornado warnings and 388 severe thunderstorm warnings. At one point, 31 separate tornado warnings were in effect during the outbreak, and an area larger than Nebraska--81,000 square miles--received tornado warnings. Tornado watches were posted for 300,000 square miles--an area larger than Texas.


Video 1. Spectacular video of the EF-4 tornado that devastated Henrysville and Marysville, Indiana on March 2, 2012. You can see small satellite vorticies rotating on the side of the main vortex.


Video 2. Another video of the EF-4 tornado that devastated Henrysville and Marysville, Indiana on March 2, 2012, taken from a gas station.

The deadliest and most violent tornado: an EF-4
The deadliest and most violent tornado of the March 2, 2012 outbreak was an EF-4 with winds up to 175 mph that demolished much of Henryville, Chelsea, Marysville, and New Pekin, Indiana. Ten minutes after that tornado demolished much of Henryville, a weaker EF-1 tornado hit the town. The twin tornadoes killed twelve people. The Henryville tornado was the only violent EF-4 tornado of the outbreak.



Figure 1. Radar reflectivity image (top) and Doppler velocity image (bottom) of the two tornadoes that hit Henryville, Indiana on March 2, 2012. The first (rightmost) hook echo on the reflectivity image belonged to the only violent tornado of the outbreak, an EF-4 with winds of 166 - 200 mph. Ten minutes after that tornado demolished much of Henryville, a second tornado hit the town. These tornadoes also caused severe damage to the towns of Chelsea, Marysville, and New Pekin, and killed twelve people.

At least eleven other tornadoes in the outbreak have been classified as EF-3s with winds of 136 - 165 mph. Capitalclimate.com reports that the EF-3 tornadoes that crossed three Eastern Kentucky counties were the first tornadoes that strong ever observed, since tornado records began in 1950. The deadliest of the EF-3 tornadoes hit West Liberty, Kentucky, killing eight. Here's a summary of the deadly tornadoes of the outbreak taken from Wikipedia:

EF-4, 12 deaths, Henrysville, Indiana
EF-3, 8 deaths, West Liberty, Kentucky\
EF-2, 5 deaths, East Bernstadt, Kentucky
EF-3, 4 deaths, Crittenden, Kentucky
EF-3, 2 deaths, Holton, Indiana
EF-3, 3 deaths, Peach Grove, Ohio
EF-3, 2 deaths, Blaine, Kentucky
EF-3, 2 deaths, Salyersville, Kentucky
EF-2, 1 death, Jackson's Gap, Alabama


Figure 2. Damage in West Liberty, Kentucky after the March 2, 2012 EF-3 tornado. Image taken from from a Kentucky National Guard Blackhawk helicopter, while landing in West Liberty, KY (Morgan County).


Figure 3. Radar image of the West Liberty, Kentucky EF-3 tornado of March 2, 2012, showing a classic hook echo. The tornado carved a 60-mile-long path through Eastern Kentucky, causing extreme damage in West Liberty. The tornado killed six in West Liberty and two near Frenchburg. At least 75 people were injured. It was the first EF-3 tornado in Eastern Kentucky since 1988.


Video 3. A woman prays for deliverance of West Liberty as the ominous wall cloud of the developing tornado approaches the town.

Incredibly fast-moving storms
The speed with which some of the storms moved was truly exceptional, thanks to jet stream winds of up to 115 mph that pushed the thunderstorms forward at amazing speeds. A number of the tornadoes ripped through Kentucky with forward speeds of 70 mph, and two tornado warnings in Central Kentucky were issued for parent thunderstorms that moved at 85 mph. NWS damage surveys have not yet determined if one of the tornadoes from the outbreak has beaten the record for the fastest moving tornado, the 73 mph forward speed of the great 1925 Tri-State Tornado, the deadliest U.S. tornado of all-time.


Video 4. A family gets in their car in an attempt to flee the Borden, Indiana tornado of March 2, 2012. Unless you know what you're doing, fleeing a tornado in a car can be extremely dangerous, especially when the tornadoes are moving at speeds of 50 - 70 mph, as many were doing during the March 2, 2012 outbreak. Most tornado fatalities occur in mobile homes and cars.

Largest 5-day and 2nd largest 2-day tornado outbreak for so early in the year?
The March 2 tornado outbreak spawned 128 tornadoes, according to preliminary reports as of 8 am EST March 7 from NOAA's Storm Prediction Center. An additional 11 tornadoes (preliminary) touched down on March 3, in Florida and Georgia; 3 additional tornadoes touched down on March 1 (Wikipedia does a great job tallying the stats for this tornado outbreak.) These preliminary reports are typically over-counted by 15%, but a few delayed reports will likely come in, bringing the total number of tornadoes from the March 2 - 3 outbreak to 115 - 125, propelling it into second place for the largest two-day tornado outbreak so early in the year. The top five two-day tornado outbreaks for so early in the year, since record keeping began in 1950:

January 21 - 22, 1999: 129 tornadoes, 4 deaths
March 2 - 3, 2012: 139 tornadoes (preliminary), 39 deaths
February 5 - 6, 2008: 87 tornadoes, 57 deaths
February 28 - March 1, 1997: 60 tornadoes, 10 deaths
January 7 - 8, 2008: 56 tornadoes, 4 deaths

Though the 36 tornadoes that occurred during the February 28 - 29 Leap Day outbreak were part of a separate storm system, the five-day tornado total from February 28 - March 3, 2012 is likely to eclipse the late January 18 - 22, 1999 five-day tornado outbreak (131 tornadoes) as the most prolific five-day period of tornado activity on record for so early in the year.


Figure 4. A key ingredient for tornado formation is the presence of warm, moist air near the surface, which helps make the atmosphere unstable. On the day of the March 2, 2012 outbreak, record warm air surged northwards into the tornado formation region, setting or tying daily high temperature records at 28 airports in Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Georgia.

Ingredients for the tornado outbreak
This year's unusually mild winter has led to ocean temperatures across the Gulf of Mexico that are approximately 1°C above average--among the top ten warmest values on record for this time of year, going back to the 1800s. (Averaged over the month of February, the highest sea surface temperatures on record in the Gulf between 20 - 30°N, 85 - 95°W occurred in 2002, when the waters were 1.34°C above average). Friday's tornado outbreak was fueled, in part, by high instability created by unusually warm, moist air flowing north from the Gulf of Mexico due to the high water temperatures there. This exceptionally warm air set record high temperatures at 28 airports in Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Georgia the afternoon of the tornado outbreak (March 2.) Cold, dry air from Canada moved over the outbreak region at high altitudes. This created a highly unstable atmosphere--warm, low-density air rising in thunderstorm updrafts was able to accelerate rapidly upwards to the top of the lower atmosphere, since the surrounding air was cooler and denser at high altitudes. These vigorous updrafts needed some twisting motion to get them spinning and create tornadoes. Very strong twisting forces were present Friday over the tornado outbreak area, thanks to upper-level jet stream winds that blew in excess of 115 mph. These winds changed speed and direction sharply with height,imparting a shearing motion on the atmosphere (wind shear), causing the air to spin. High instability and a high wind shear are the two key ingredients for tornado formation.


Figure 5. The other key ingredient for tornado formation is the presence of very strong winds aloft that change speed and direction sharply with height. This change of wind imparts a shearing motion on the atmosphere (wind shear), causing the air to spin. Here, we see the upper-level wind speeds at the peak of the March 2, 2012 tornado outbreak. The jet stream can be seen as the U-shaped belt of strong winds. Jet stream winds in excess of 100 mph (deep blue colors) were present over the tornado outbreak area in this analysis of data from the NOAA North American Model (NAM) from 7 pm EST March 2, 2012. Image credit: NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory.

Another bad year for tornadoes in the U.S.--what's going on?
Last year's tornado season was incredibly severe, and we are off to one of the worst early-season starts to tornado season on record now in 2012. However, it is too soon to ring the alarm bells on climate change being responsible for this. The tornado data base going back to 1950 doesn't show an increasing trend in strong tornadoes in recent decades. While climate change could potentially lead to an increase in tornadoes, by increasing instability, it could also decrease them, by decreasing wind shear. I'd need to see a lot more bad tornado years before blaming climate change for the severe tornado seasons of the past two years. One thing that climate change may be doing, though, is shifting the season earlier in the year. The 5-day total of tornadoes from February 28 - March 3 will probably break the record of 131 set in 1999 for the largest tornado outbreak so early in the year. Warmer winters, and an earlier arrival of spring due to a warming climate, will allow tornado season to start earlier--and end earlier. This year's early start to tornado season is consistent with what we would expect from a warming climate. I have a more extensive article on this subject that has just been published by Weatherwise magazine, and a 2008 post, Are tornadoes getting stronger and more frequent? Dr. Jonathan Martin of the University of Wisconsin-Madison is doing interesting research on the type of situation we saw with some of the recent severe tornado outbreaks, when two branches of the jet stream, the polar jet and the subtropical jet, merge to form a "superjet." In a December 2011 interview with sciencedaily.com, he said: "There is reason to believe that in a warmer climate, this kind of overlapping of the jet streams that can lead to high-impact weather may be more frequent."

I don't see any storm systems coming over the next 10 days that could cause a major tornado outbreak, though March weather is too volatile to forecast reliably that far in advance. There is a storm system expected to develop on Thursday in the Plains we will have to watch, but so far, indications are that it will not be capable of generating a major tornado outbreak.

Portlight disaster relief charity responds to the tornado disaster
The Portlight disaster relief charity reports that volunteers from colleges and churches made a strong showing in tornado-devastated Harrisburg, Illinois on Sunday. Team Rubicon and Portlight will push east to Indiana, where volunteer work is still restricted because of gas leaks and continuing SAR (search and rescue) operations.

I'll edit this post with new stats on the tornado outbreak as they become available, and have an entirely new post on Wednesday.

Jeff Masters

Tornado (JimAtTn)
This picture of a small tornado was taken on Friday March 02, 2012 in southern Lincoln County, Tennessee about 7 miles south of Fayetteville. Photographer: Angela Currey-Echols
Tornado
3/2/12 Tornado (charles7013)
A tornado in Dodsen Brach TN.
3/2/12 Tornado
High Risk (LightningFastMedia)
Rotating wall cloud and a possible funnel yesterday, north of Evansville, IN.
High Risk
tornado damage 3/2/12 (clerese3)
3/2/12 tornado damage to a business I pass on my way to and from work. This was a beautiful brick building.
tornado damage 3/2/12
Tornado Damage - TN (GeorgiaPeach)
I uploaded this photo once already and it was rejected for having the wrong date. I explained before, but I will explain again. The tornado came through March 2nd but I had just gotten out of the hospital, so I didn't get out to take pictures of the damage until today. This is five miles from my house in Hamilton County, TN.
Tornado Damage - TN

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Quoting SPLbeater:


Mom pointed out why english is hard to learn.

Bomb,
Comb,
Tomb are all spelled similar, but the o is different in dem all!
It's that darn phonics!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting ScottLincoln:


Actually, could be a perfectly good excuse. A storm moving 60mph and covering only 3 miles... that easily could have a tornado touchdown between radar scans, effectively being missed. Without quick spotter reports, a lack of anything ominous on radar equals a lack of a warning. Remember that before the 1990s, it was almost all on the spotters, so if the tornado decided to form right on your town first, too bad.

Either we reduce the false alarm rate by being more sure, or we ignore the false alarm rate to try and do the best on probability of detection. But we really can't have it both ways, and we already see some of the consequences of focusing almost entirely on POD.



Depends on the office. GR2Analyst is not the standard issue radar software. AWIPS is.
Good point Scott.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22604
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

I like the Target dog.
same dawgg
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Oh, a signed an E-petition the other day. It was about the National Weather Service, in fact.
good for you
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Quoting hydrus:
Maybe age is not just a number .:)
It shows he has free time, unlike those of us who have to work. :P
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Quoting KoritheMan:


It's called flexibility in synonyms. The English language is full of them.


Mom pointed out why english is hard to learn.

Bomb,
Comb,
Tomb are all spelled similar, but the o is different in dem all!
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Quoting KoritheMan:


It's called flexibility in synonyms. The English language is full of them.

Ok ma'am.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TomTaylor:
Well you would have to join on 07/06/10, write 44 blogs, and make 13,118 comments. It's really that simple :)
Of course its that simple. Seems that he would have been around a lot more to squeeze that many comments in the space of a year and a half. Like Kori for instance, he has been a Member Since March 7, 2007, he has 245 posts and 11180 Comments, and is a regular. ..Just strange...Maybe age is not just a number .:)
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22604
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

What does being tired or bored have to do with being angry and upset?


It's called flexibility in synonyms. The English language is full of them.
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Quoting TomTaylor:
That sucks, but I'm not surprised after watching that documentary. Sounds like most the managers and store managers are basically told by their higher ups to run the ship as tight as possible and make employees feel as if they can easily be replaced if they are not willing to cooperate.

So, as much as you are in the right and not violating the policy, I'd be careful with what you do cause I'm sure Walmart would be more than willing to hire someone else in your position who will work those last few minutes.


Oh don't worry, I'm well aware that the managers expect you to follow their arbitrary policy. But I bet they don't wish to tangle with home office.
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Quoting ScottLincoln:


Actually, could be a perfectly good excuse. A storm moving 60mph and covering only 3 miles... that easily could have a tornado touchdown between radar scans, effectively being missed. Without quick spotter reports, a lack of anything ominous on radar equals a lack of a warning. Remember that before the 1990s, it was almost all on the spotters, so if the tornado decided to form right on your town first, too bad.

Either we reduce the false alarm rate by being more sure, or we ignore the false alarm rate to try and do the best on probability of detection. But we really can't have it both ways, and we already see some of the consequences of focusing almost entirely on POD.



Depends on the office. GR2Analyst is not the standard issue radar software. AWIPS is.
Scott, I like your posts...lol
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Velocities on both storms exceeded 200 knots.
Yeah but by the time the radar beam reaches the tornado, the beam is already several hundred or possibly even a couple thousand feet in the air. Also, as scottlincoln said in an earlier post, it's just a remote sensing device.
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Quoting KoritheMan:


It's what those of us who are jaded do to vent our frustration.

What does being tired or bored have to do with being angry and upset?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Irina down to 45 knots. MAweathaboy, be grateful lol.
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Quoting TomTaylor:
Well you would have to join on 07/06/10, write 44 blogs, and make 13,118 comments. It's really that simple :)

smart aleck..lol.
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Quoting AussieStorm:
Look at the structure of this Tropical Low off the coast of SE Queensland.




Loop
fair dinkum, look at that

(testin out my aussie slang)
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Yeah, not a very good excuse...


Actually, could be a perfectly good excuse. A storm moving 60mph and covering only 3 miles... that easily could have a tornado touchdown between radar scans, effectively being missed. Without quick spotter reports, a lack of anything ominous on radar equals a lack of a warning. Remember that before the 1990s, it was almost all on the spotters, so if the tornado decided to form right on your town first, too bad.

Either we reduce the false alarm rate by being more sure, or we ignore the false alarm rate to try and do the best on probability of detection. But we really can't have it both ways, and we already see some of the consequences of focusing almost entirely on POD.

Quoting KoritheMan:


Do they even use GR2Analyst?


Depends on the office. GR2Analyst is not the standard issue radar software. AWIPS is.
Member Since: September 28, 2002 Posts: 5 Comments: 3325
Quoting washingtonian115:
I have a language problem to.Post 329 is an example.


shall i remind you when something slips so u can modify ur comment to exclude the language then? :D

Quoting KoritheMan:


Wouldn't be the first time I've made enemies. :P

I admit, I do have a language problem. Try to overlook it, but I will also try and tone it down.


anybody who has supporters, will have enenmies. i got people talking junk bout me each day..i dont hear it, so it doesnt effect me:)
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Quoting washingtonian115:
I have a language problem to.Post 329 is an example.


It's what those of us who are jaded do to vent our frustration.
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Quoting hydrus:
Speaking of numbers. How is it that someone who has been blogging here since 07/06/10 has 44 posts and 13118 comments? I have been active here since 09/27/07, I am not even close to that and post regularly. I remember you posting a lot, but not that much. I am just curious.
Well you would have to join on 07/06/10, write 44 blogs, and make 13,118 comments. It's really that simple :)
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Quoting KoritheMan:


Unfortunately there is no Target in the vicinity. Come to think of it, given how industrialized my little town has been since my family moved here in 1973, I am a bit surprised by that.

But yeah, they definitely abuse their employees. Had a run in with a manager the other day who complained I was clocking out too early. I might be new, but I am extremely well-versed in company policy. The particular policy in question validates and excuses my action. I was going to clock out 10 minutes early, since company policy says you can do that. You have a 14 minute window for showing up from the time of your scheduled entry, meaning I could show up as late as 4:14 if I'm due for 4:00, and still technically not violate the boundaries of company policy. Same deal with the whole clocking out early thing. Company policy says that it is permissible as long as you do so within 10 minutes or less of your scheduled absence.

He was like "Go back to your department and work until 9:25." By that time it was about 9:22. Sorry, but you're an idiot. By the time I get back to my department, it will already be 9:25. That same manager should still be there when I go in tomorrow. I'm going to clock out early and hope he's around. I understand I'm losing money by not waiting until exactly 9:30, but I think trying to prove a point overrides that loss. If he tries to argue with company policy, I'm taking it to the store manager. I am not your pawn, and I won't kiss your ass. Period.

They don't call me the son of an ex-assistant manager for nothing. Though I must say, it's rather sad when a mere associate knows more about store operations and protocol than the management team.
That sucks, but I'm not surprised after watching that documentary. Sounds like most the managers and store managers are basically told by their higher ups to run the ship as tight as possible and make employees feel as if they can easily be replaced if they are not willing to cooperate.

So, as much as you are in the right and not violating the policy, I'd be careful with what you do cause I'm sure Walmart would be more than willing to hire someone else in your position who will work those last few minutes.
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Quoting KoritheMan:


Wouldn't be the first time I've made enemies. :P

I admit, I do have a language problem. Try to overlook it, but I will also try and tone it down.
I have a language problem to.Post 329 is an example.
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Quoting SPLbeater:


10 minutes ago

the reason you were on there (september 2011 to now) wqs because i had seen a few comments of yours when i first joined, that werent for children. and myself being a teenager, i didnt want to read/see them:)

No offense :D


Wouldn't be the first time I've made enemies. :P

I admit, I do have a language problem. Try to overlook it, but I will also try and tone it down.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TomTaylor:
Well you shouldn't. I know you can't vote yet, but the government effects you in countless ways everyday, and you also have the ability to influence the government.

Also, if you are ever unhappy with the US government, remember the best thing you can do is to get involved in some form of political participation. Whether it's voting, campaigning, litigating, or signing a petition, if you wish to see a change, make that change happen.

All those folks who are unhappy with the government and say screw the government, but continue to sit there and do nothing are doing no good for anyone.

Oh, a signed an E-petition the other day. It was about the National Weather Service, in fact.
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Quoting RukusBoondocks:
Well good lord nothing like watching Torn Tomatoes spin in the skyy


your that dude who a few months ago kept leaving comments about some thunderstorm in the caribbean might become a TD.

hmmmmmm
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Quoting washingtonian115:
I have read about cases like those.Like the one we're wemon at Walmart were being treated unfairly.
yes, that was in the documentary too. One case was a women being forced to clean the toilets everyday because there were no other women at the store.
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Quoting CybrTeddy:


Was in a certain storm in 2003 myself that hit the East Coast. Bad event I tell ya, glad it wasn't a Category 5 like it was.


Cyber, I like to experience hurricanes as much as the next guy does, but even I'm not stupid enough to tussle with a Category 5.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Age is nothing but a number.
Speaking of numbers. How is it that someone who has been blogging here since 07/06/10 has 44 posts and 13118 comments? I have been active here since 09/27/07, I am not even close to that and post regularly. I remember you posting a lot, but not that much. I am just curious.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 22604
Well good lord nothing like watching Torn Tomatoes spin in the skyy
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

I could care less about the United States government at this point in time.
Well you shouldn't. I know you can't vote yet, but the government effects you in countless ways everyday, and you also have the ability to influence the government.

Also, if you are ever unhappy with the US government, remember the best thing you can do is to get involved in some form of political participation. Whether it's voting, campaigning, litigating, or signing a petition, if you wish to see a change, make that change happen.

All those folks who are unhappy with the government and say screw the government, but continue to sit there and do nothing are doing no good for anyone.
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Quoting TomTaylor:
Kori we were watching a documentary in my government class called "Walmart: The High Cost of Low Price." The documentary basically talked about many different cases of Walmart abusing their employees to get the maximum profit out of their business. I can say now that I have a bit more sympathy for you, for workin at that lame ass company.

Target all the way!


Unfortunately there is no Target in the vicinity. Come to think of it, given how industrialized my little town has been since my family moved here in 1973, I am a bit surprised by that.

But yeah, they definitely abuse their employees. Had a run in with a manager the other day who complained I was clocking out too early. I might be new, but I am extremely well-versed in company policy. The particular policy in question validates and excuses my action. I was going to clock out 10 minutes early, since company policy says you can do that. You have a 14 minute window for showing up from the time of your scheduled entry, meaning I could show up as late as 4:14 if I'm due for 4:00, and still technically not violate the boundaries of company policy. Same deal with the whole clocking out early thing. Company policy says that it is permissible as long as you do so within 10 minutes or less of your scheduled absence.

He was like "Go back to your department and work until 9:25." By that time it was about 9:22. Sorry, but you're an idiot. By the time I get back to my department, it will already be 9:25. That same manager should still be there when I go in tomorrow. I'm going to clock out early and hope he's around. I understand I'm losing money by not waiting until exactly 9:30, but I think trying to prove a point overrides that loss. If he tries to argue with company policy, I'm taking it to the store manager. I am not your pawn, and I won't kiss your ass. Period.

They don't call me the son of an ex-assistant manager for nothing. Though I must say, it's rather sad when a mere associate knows more about store operations and protocol than the management team.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting CybrTeddy:


Was in a certain storm in 2003 myself that hit the East Coast. Bad event I tell ya, glad it wasn't a Category 5 like it was.
Grr that Isabel!.She knocked out power at my place for two weeks.Then my basement was flooded.Parts of D.C were under water like George Town.
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Quoting TomTaylor:
Kori we were watching a documentary in my government class called "Walmart: The High Cost of Low Price." The documentary basically talked about many different cases of Walmart abusing their employees to get the maximum profit out of their business. I can say now that I have a bit more sympathy for you, for workin at that lame ass company.

Target all the way!

I like the Target dog.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

I do not plan on being bored to death anytime soon.

I think that is superfluous.
Back to hurricane season it is :).
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Quoting washingtonian115:
LOLOL.2002-03 was a cold winter.That year storms mainly struck the east coast and recurved or formed by Africa.Florida was not hardly struck but besides one storm.Their was I think 4 landfalls on the Gulf but they were weak storms.In warm winters like 05 the Gulf had gotten struck by several strong hurricanes.


Was in a certain storm in 2003 myself that hit the East Coast. Bad event I tell ya, glad it wasn't a Category 5 like it was.
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Quoting TomTaylor:
Kori we were watching a documentary in my government class called "Walmart: The High Cost of Low Price." The documentary basically talked about many different cases of Walmart abusing their employees to get the maximum profit out of their business. I can say now that I have a bit more sympathy for you, for workin at that lame ass company.

Target all the way!
I have read about cases like those.Like the one we're wemon at Walmart were being treated unfairly.
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Quoting KoritheMan:


Do I need to summon yqt and have him tell you the importance of politics? Given the way youthful thought processes work, I think you'd be more inclined to listen to someone your age.

I do not plan on being bored to death anytime soon.

I think that is superfluous.
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Quoting KoritheMan:
When did you take me off ignore, SPL? o_O


10 minutes ago

the reason you were on there (september 2011 to now) wqs because i had seen a few comments of yours when i first joined, that werent for children. and myself being a teenager, i didnt want to read/see them:)

No offense :D
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Quoting JNCali:
Anyone ever figure the average distance a tornado can stretch or reach from the base of its 'cloud'? Looking at a radar image, is there a way to determine where a funnel would/could touch down?
As I was monitoring the rotating cell with a hook heading my direction it would have been nice to have an idea of how far a possible funnel would reach from the hook.. (if this is way stupid please feel free to ridicule) :)


The LCL and the LFC might be decent approximations for a particular day. But I'm not sure that there is a black/white cut-off for where the tornado ends and the mesocyclone begins.

Quoting DavidHOUTX:


I still believe that the Henryville tornado was an EF5. When you seen a house completely removed from its foundation, that is an EF5. I know the framework and strength of the house and the reinforcements of the house matter but as some of the pictures above show, that had to be an EF5.


No, not necessarily. But either way, it's not like we have a deadline for when the local WFO must decide on a final rating and then it is permanent. Lots of tornadoes to rate and when they have time to take another look at it, it may end up getting bumped up.
Member Since: September 28, 2002 Posts: 5 Comments: 3325
Quoting KoritheMan:


The United States government says otherwise.
Kori we were watching a documentary in my government class called "Walmart: The High Cost of Low Price." The documentary basically talked about many different cases of Walmart abusing their employees to get the maximum profit out of their business. I can say now that I have a bit more sympathy for you, for workin at that lame ass company.

Target all the way!
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

I could care less about the United States government at this point in time.
That's harsh.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

I could care less about the United States government at this point in time.


Do I need to summon yqt and have him tell you the importance of politics? Given the way youthful thought processes work, I think you'd be more inclined to listen to someone your age.
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Quoting KoritheMan:


What? No it's not. It's MOG.
Oh damn my brain is all f***ed up.Well at least i was right about the gulf being shaped almost like an actual G.
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When did you take me off ignore, SPL? o_O
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Quoting KoritheMan:


The United States government says otherwise.

I could care less about the United States government at this point in time.
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Quoting washingtonian115:
P.S the GOM spelled backwards in OMG.....like "Oh my gosh"...just thought I'd point that out.

Another point is that the Gulf is almost shaped like a "G" it's self.Don't believe me look at the land charts.xD

LOL no it's not.

GOM = MOG
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Quoting KoritheMan:


I thought [Censored] was such a common word that it didn't need censoring.


aint used in my house, nor my comments either :D
Quoting washingtonian115:
P.S the GOM spelled backwards in OMG.....like "Oh my gosh"...just thought I'd point that out.


Hurricane Camille, with an eye atleast 10miles wide at landfall, and an eyewall(estimating...5-10miles wide) had 200mph winds at landfall.

Thats an EF5 tornado over atleast 15-20 miles 0.o
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Quoting washingtonian115:
P.S the GOM spelled backwards in OMG.....like "Oh my gosh"...just thought I'd point that out.


What? No it's not. It's MOG.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Age is nothing but a number.


The United States government says otherwise.
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Another point is that the Gulf is almost shaped like a "G" it's self.Don't believe me look at the land charts.xD
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Quoting KoritheMan:


*heads to Home Depot to stock up on plywood*


Time to put on my Ham hat.

*Orders that new battery for his handy-talkie.*
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Quoting washingtonian115:
LOLOL.2002-03 was a cold winter.That year storms mainly struck the east coast and recurved or formed by Africa.Florida was not hardly struck but besides one storm.Their was I think 4 landfalls on the Gulf but they were weak storms.In warm winters like 05 the Gulf had gotten struck by several strong hurricanes.
EDIT.In 2008 the gulf had gotten struck by several hurricanes and that year futered a warm winter as I've said earlier.If the pattern sets up then Florida and the Gulf better watch their back..Not trying to be all doom and gloom here as i know people were affected by the tornados.
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